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Penal Code Section 1203.4 Expungement in California

If you’ve been charged with a crime, you may be wondering if you can expunge the record of your arrest and conviction. Penal Code Section 1203.4 is the statute that sets out the process for doing so, and it provides that an eligible defendant can apply to have the records of their arrest and conviction expunged. However, expungement is a complex process, and it’s important to understand the eligibility requirements and the process for getting expungement in California. We can help.


When you have committed a crime, one of the worst feelings in the world is knowing that the details of your crime are going to follow you around for the rest of your life. Penal Code Section 1203.4 Expungement in California is a way for you to get those records, and other related information about your crime, removed from your background check. This means that background checks for many jobs won't reveal your record, and you can get jobs, housing, and other opportunities that wouldn't have been available before. This is a big deal.



Criminal expungement is the process of clearing the records of certain criminal records. In California, the criminal expungement statute, Penal Code 1203.4, makes it possible for certain individuals who have been convicted of certain designated crimes to have their criminal records expunged. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the expungement process in California, including the various types of criminal records that may be expunged, the steps required to expunge a record, and the background and requirements needed to file a petition to expunge a record.


The California legislature has taken a number of steps to make it easier for individuals to expunge the records of their past criminal convictions. The California expungement statute, allows individuals to petition the court to have their records expunged. The California expungement statute provides three ways that an individual can have their records expunged after a successful application is submitted to the court:


(1) the statute in some cases provides for automatic expungement upon the completion of the underlying sentence;

(2) the statute provides for a “good faith” expungement; and

(3) the statute provides for judicial expungement.


California has a unique system for expunging criminal records. Those who have completed their sentences and aren’t currently in legal jeopardy can petition the court to have their records expunged. This process can help those who want to erase a potentially damaging record, such as a conviction for a minor offense, prevent a background check from showing a record, or get a job or education. It can also help those who have already completed their sentences but have remained in the community and don’t want to be stigmatized, such as those who have served their time in prison and are now on parole or probation.


If you have been convicted of a crime in California, you may be wondering if you will ever be able to clear your record. The answer to that question depends on the type of crime you were convicted of, and the timing of when the conviction occurred. This series will explore the different types of crimes that can result in a criminal record, and the ways in which you can have your record expunged depending on the timing of the conviction. I will also discuss the different methods that are available to have your conviction expunged, as well as the process for each.



When it comes to the expungement of criminal records in California, the first thing to understand is the distinction between expungement and sealing. Expungement is the process of having a criminal record “expunged” or “cleared.” When a court expunges a criminal record, it is as if the record never happened. This means that a background check will not show the record if one is being conducted, and it will appear to a person that the conviction never occurred.


One thing to note is that the expungement process in California is limited to certain crimes. The most common type of conviction that results in a criminal record is a conviction for a crime in which the individual was charged with a felony. Other common types of convictions that result in a criminal record include a conviction for a crime involving physical violence or a crime in which the individual was charged with a misdemeanor. However, the expungement statute in California also provides for the expungement of certain other types of convictions, such as a conviction for a drug related offense.


Generally speaking, the types of crimes that result in a criminal record include felonies and misdemeanors. Felonies are crimes that are considered serious offenses, such as murder, rape, and arson. Misdemeanors are crimes that are considered less serious offenses, such as petty theft, vandalism, public intoxication and assault. Both felonies and misdemeanors result in a criminal record that can be expunged depending on the timing of the conviction. Many factors go into expunging a record which is why it is important to see if you fit the qualifications.




Another avenue that an individual can have a criminal conviction expunged is by obtaining a “good faith” expungement. To obtain a “good faith” expungement, an individual must file a petition with the court demonstrating that they have taken reasonable steps to have their record expunged. Examples of reasonable steps include submitting a background check and paying any fines or fees that are required in order to have your record expunged. If the court determines that you have taken reasonable steps to have your record expunged, it will expunge your record without requiring that you make a monetary payment.


The California expungement statute provides that if an individual requests in a “good faith” manner to have their records expunged, the court will expunge the record in that proceeding. This is the easiest way to have a criminal conviction expunged if you were convicted of a crime that resulted in a criminal record. However, it is important to note that the court must find in a “good faith” manner that you have demonstrated that you have taken steps to rehabilitate and that it is in the best interest of justice to expunge the record.


In California, a DUI expungement is different than other types of expungements. For this reason it is wise to get the assistance of an attorney. In addition to that, the process of getting a DUI expunged requires more than other types of expungements.

The process for DUI expungement in California is as follows:

- The person must wait until their sentence is completed or file for a motion to terminate early.

- They must also have no other convictions on their record during that time period.

- They must also have completed all terms of their sentence, including probation and parole.

- They must also have paid all fines and restitution associated with the DUI conviction.



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